My Colby-Sawyer Experience

I used a lot of the research and writing techniques I learned in my philosophy and media studies classes. Now that I know I can do something as large as this project, I have a new sense of confidence.
Andrew Baker, Communication Studies

175th Celebration

In 2012 the college celebrated 175 years as an institution of teaching and learning. Visit the 175th website for more information and to view photos of the events.

Blue Spruce Picea pungens
Pine Pinaceae family

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Leaves: Needles are sharp and stiff growing 1"-1.5" long. This spruce can be distinguished by its blueish green needles.

Flower/Fruits: Cones are 2.5"-4" long and the scales are both thin and flexible. Cones mature in August and can have a range of 85-195 seeds per cone.

Twigs/Bark: Twigs are mostly hairless and both needles and branches are dense. Branches are stout and horizontal to drooping. Bark can range from about an 1"-1.5" thick.

Form/Habitat: Blue Spruce has shallow roots, commoly reaching only 2 vertical feet but despite this the tree is still windfirm. Grows well in cool climates that are subhumid to humid and prefers loamy soils that are sandy to gravelly and well drained. Blue spruce can reach hieghts of 70'-115' and is pyramidal in shape.

Interesting Fact: Blue spruce is a slow growing tree and in a nursery, it grew only 19.1 to 23.3 inches tall after 5 years. This tree is commonly used in landscaping.

NWI Status: NO (No Occurance in this area, though this is heavily planted in our area it does not naturally occur here. Natural occurance regions for Blue Spruce include the Northwest, Southwest, and the Intermountain regions of CO,NV, and UT.)



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