Spring 2011 Events





Marc Elliott presents: “What Makes You Tic”
Monday, January 24, 2011 at 7 p.m.
Wheeler Hall, Ware Campus Center

Co-sponsored by the Cultural Events Committee and Campus Activities Board
Marc Elliot knows the importance of understanding people's differences. He was born with a rare disease that left him with virtually no intestines, and at age nine, he developed a neurological disorder called Tourette's syndrome. Now, at the age of 25 he is inspiring audiences all across the country by sharing his life story to convey the value of tolerance and the basic attitudes and behaviors that allow it to flourish. Marc graduated from Washington University in St. Louis and currently lives in Boston. For more information, click here. This event is free and open to the public.

Dave Anderson presents: “Pirate Valley Expedition”
Tuesday, January 25, 2011 at 7 p.m.
Wheeler Hall, Ware Campus Center

Adventurer and climber Dave Anderson's multi-media presentation chronicles his February 2009 attempt at an unclimbed route in a remote region of Patagonia, Argentina. For more information, click here. This event is free and open to the public.

Film: Reporter
Monday, January 31, 2011 at 7 p.m.
Clements Hall, Ivey Science Center

“Reporter” is a feature documentary about Nicholas Kristof, the two-time Pulitzer Prize winning columnist for the New York Times, who almost single-handedly put the crisis in Darfur on the world map. The film follows Kristof, revealing the man and his methods, and just how and why real reporting is vital to our democracy, our world-awareness, and our capacity to be a force for good.
In the summer of 2007, Kristof traveled to the Democratic Republic of the Congo to shine his light into the darkest pockets of conflict and poverty. Congo is a country in the midst of a humanitarian crisis. To date, 5.4 million people have been killed in Congo over the last decade. The core reason - instability. This is Kristof's charge - to put Congo on the international agenda. But Kristof knows that statistics deaden his readers' interest and compassion. So to get the world to care, he goes in search of individuals whose stories will reflect the country's desperate crisis and mobilize readers worldwide. He journeys through ravaged villages and displacement camps, and makes a harrowing visit to Congo's reigning rebel warlord, General Nkunda, at his jungle hideout.
For more information, click here. This event is free and open to the public.

Ian Ethan Case
Thursday, February 24, 2011 at 7 p.m.
Wheeler Hall, Ware Campus Center

Sponsored in part with funds from the Helen L Eberle Endowment for Music Performance
Acoustic Double-Neck Guitarist Ian Ethan began a journey into truly uncharted territory when he picked up this seldom-seen 18-string instrument in 2005 after leaving the Berklee College of Music. Drawing on a diverse musical background that saw him learning piano, drums, saxophone, electric guitar and bass beginning at the age of five, his strikingly-unconventional, self-invented approach to the double-neck guitar is mesmerizing to behold. He has developed nearly a dozen different playing techniques which he fluidly combines, fully engaging the entire array of strings, frets, tuners, and soundboards. Even as he continues to forge ahead with the double-neck, another unique instrument has found its way into his music. The small, unassuming African kalimba has triggered the enthusiastic interest of audiences of all ages and backgrounds across the country. Though at first glance the diminutive 12-key "thumb piano" almost seems toy-like, its surprisingly rich and mellow tone serves as a refreshing alternative voice to the double-neck in his live performances. At the same time, its connection to the rest of Ethan's music becomes clear through the kalimba's percussive and melodic nature, and in the way that he uses an unusual instrument in his own way to deliver new music that speaks in a way that words cannot. For more information, click here. This event is free and open to the public.

Film: The Blind Side
Monday, February 28, 2011 at 7 p.m.
Clements Hall, Ivey Science Center

This film is the remarkable true story of Michael Oher, a homeless youngster from a broken home. Michael was taken in by the well-to-do Tuohy family, who helped him fulfill his potential as a person and as an athlete. He worked hard on the field and in the classroom and became an All-American in college and was picked in the first round of the 2009 NFL Draft, changing his life and the lives of the loving family who were there to watch him succeed. This film features an Academy Award-winning performance by Sandra Bullock. For more information, click here. This event is free and open to the public.

Haider Hamza presents: How is a War Ever Won?
Tuesday, March 1, 2011 at 7 p.m.
Wheeler Hall, Ware Campus Center

Twenty-four year old Iraqi journalist Haider Hamza shares his unique story. Born in Germany, raised in Iraq and now living in the United States, Hamza's powerful and fascinating lecture talks about the losses of both nations involved in a war; except one nation loses more than the other, but that does not make a winner. It examines the suffering and challenges of both Iraqi civilians and US soldiers during the Iraq war.For more information, click here. This event is free and open to the public.

Mark Anderson presents: “If It's Physical, It's Therapy – Recognizing the Benefits of Sport and Physical Activity for Persons with Disability”
Tuesday, March 15, 2011 at 7 p.m.
Wheeler Hall, Ware Campus Center

By the very definition of “disability”, individuals with disabilities, whether congenital or acquired, are assumed to have limitations. Those perceived limitations may encompass personal, social, and societal norms. It is also widely recognized that there is value in participation in sport or physical activity, including both physical and mental benefits. However, the perception is that this value is generally limited to the able-bodied individual. Part of this perception comes from a lack of understanding of the opportunities for sports and recreational activities for persons with disability. And another part of this perception comes from a lack of knowledge about the benefits (and risks) of sports and physical activity. While risks associated with increased physical activity and sports participation are inherent for anyone, the benefits far exceed the risks, and help individuals with disabilities better integrate into society, live fuller and richer lives, and further the rehabilitation of both their minds and their bodies. This event is free and open to the public.

McPeake
Thursday, March 17, 2011 at 7 p.m.
Sawyer Center Theater, Sawyer Fine Arts Center

For generations of folk music enthusiasts the name of the McPeake Family of Belfast has stood for one of the most distinctive sounds in Irish music. Francis McPeake IV, the fourth generation of this world-famous musical dynasty and one of the few authentic uilleann pipers in the world today, has put together a revived band, 'McPeake', which is unique in the world of music with its fusion of original Celtic compositions and contemporary rhythms and styles. Tickets go on sale March 14th at 4 pm in the box office. Tickets cost $20 per adult and $15 per student. Faculty, staff and students receive one free ticket with CSC ID. For more information, click here.

Steve Buckingham presents: “How Rhythm & Blues and Rock n' Roll Tore Down the Walls of Segregation”
Tuesday, March 29, 2011 at 7 p.m.
Wheeler Hall, Ware Campus Center

A study of how music, specifically Rock & Roll and Rhythm & Blues, impacted segregation and the Civil Rights Movement. Steve Buckingham is a Grammy-award-winning producer and session musician. He has worked with artists like Dolly Parton, Linda Ronstadt, The Chieftains, Ricky Skaggs, Dionne Warwick, Tammy Wynette, Loretta Lynn and Kirk Whalum. He has placed singles in the Top Ten of eleven different radio charts, including the Pop, Country, R&B, Jazz, Adult Contemporary, Americana, Bluegrass, Christian, Hispanic, Triple A and Dance. For more information, click here. This event is free and open to the public.

Peppino D'Agostino
Thursday, March 31, 2011 at 7 p.m.
Wheeler Hall, Ware Campus Center

Paid for by the Olivetti Series Endowment Fund
Peppino D'Agostino doesn't just play the guitar. He composes, arranges, collaborates, improvises and sings in both English and Italian. His first album Bluerba, was recorded in his homeland, Italy, in 1981. He made his American recording debut in 1987 with “Acoustic Spirit,” and has since issued seven more albums. He has released collaborations with contemporary classical guitar master David Tanenbaum and electric player Stef Burns. D'Agostino also performs and has recorded with the United Guitar Ensemble. He has also released three instructional/performance DVDs as well as the book “New Acoustic Guitar.” D'Agostino designed his signature Seagull guitar which won a Silver People's Choice Award for Acoustic Guitar of the Year from “Acoustic Guitar” magazine in 2008, with innovative guitar maker Robert Godin. The readers of “Guitar Player” voted him Best Acoustic Guitarist in 2007, and the following year in “Acoustic Guitar's” People's Choice Awards he won a Bronze medal for Best Acoustic Album of All Time for his 2002 release “Every Step of The Way” and a Bronze award as Fingerstyle Guitarist of the Year. For more information, click here. This event is free and open to the public.

Film: Bag It
Monday, April 4, 2011 at 7 p.m.
Clements Hall, Ivey Science Center

Bag it is a documentary film in which an average guy makes a resolution to stop using plastic bags at the grocery store. Little does he know that this simple decision will completely change his life. He comes to the conclusion that our consumptive use of plastic has finally caught up to us, and looks at what we can do about it. For more information, click here. This event is free and open to the public.

Sister Spit
Tuesday, April 5, 2011 at 7 p.m.
Wheeler Hall, Ware Campus Center

Co-sponsored by the Cultural Events Committee and S.A.G.E. (Students Affirming Gender Equality)
The legendary, raucous, rowdy performance gang, Sister Spit, launches in San Francisco in March 2011 with a vanload of multimedia, queer-centric brilliance! Don't miss this multimedia explosion of taste-makers, novelists, fashion plates, painters, performance artists, poets and fancy scribblers. Featuring queer luminary Michelle Tea, hilarious writer and performance artist Kirk Read, graphic novelist and visual artist MariNaomi, poet laureate of the obsessed and tormented Ali Liebegott, novelist and film fodder Blake Nelson, photographer and Original Plumbing transmale quarterly publisher Amos Mac and transmitter-writer of brilliantly terrifying fairy tales Myriam Gurba! For more information, click here. This event is free and open to the public.

Buddy Wakefield
Monday, April 11, 2011 at 7 p.m.
Wheeler Hall, Ware Campus Center

Buddy Wakefield is the two-time Individual World Poetry Slam Champion featured on NPR, the BBC, HBO's Def Poetry Jam, and most recently signed to Ani DiFranco's Righteous Babe Records. In 2004 he won the Individual World Poetry Slam Finals thanks to the support of anthropologist and producer Norman Lear then successfully defended that title at the International Poetry Festival in Rotterdam, Netherlands against the national champions of seven European countries with works translated into Dutch. In 2005 he won the Individual World Poetry Slam Championship again and has gone on to share the stage with nearly every notable performance poet in the world in hundreds of venues internationally from The Great Lawn in Central Park and Scotland's Oran Mor to San Quentin State Penitentiary, House of Blues New Orleans and First Avenue. Buddy, a Board of Directors member with Youth Speaks Seattle, is honored to be published internationally in dozens of books with work used to win multiple national collegiate debate and forensics competitions. An author of Write Bloody Publishing, Wakefield is known for delivering raw, rounded, high vibration performances of humor and heart. For more information, click here. This event is free and open to the public.

Tom Stearns presents "Save the Food System, Save the World"
Tuesday, April 12, 2011 at 7 p.m.
Clements Hall, Ivey Science Center

Tom Stearns began gardening at an early age at his family home in Connecticut. Prior to completing a degree in Sustainable Agriculture from Prescott College in Arizona, he began saving seeds. A hobby was born in 1996 in Vermont, when Tom began sharing these seeds with others through a small seed flyer. High Mowing Organic Seeds has since expanded into one of the leading organic seed companies in the U.S., supplying both home gardeners and commercial growers. Tom's vision has always been to create a company that would help support the re-building of healthy food systems, first in Vermont, followed by the rest of the United States. He has also taught numerous workshops since 1996 on many topics such as agriculture education, economics, community supported agriculture, genetic engineering, plant breeding, local food systems, sustainable business, investing and more. His informal, personal style, ability to explain complex issues and infectious enthusiasm makes him a popular and inspiring speaker. In addition, he has served on the board of several agricultural organizations, most notably as the current President of The Center for an Agricultural Economy. This event is free and open to the public.