fall 2011 events

For a complete list of past, present, and future events, please click on the appropriate semester link below.
Fall 2014 Events
Spring 2014 Events
Fall 2013 Events
Spring 2013 Events
Fall 2012 Events
Spring 2012 Events
Fall 2011 Events
Spring 2011 Events

Kantis Simmons Presents: Play Your “A” Game

Wednesday, September 14, 2011 at 7 p.m.
Sawyer Center Theater, Sawyer Fine Arts Center

This event is sponsored by New Student Orientation. It is expected that all first-year students will attend this program.

Most students desire to be at the top; however, their work habits and levels of discipline do not always support their scholastic desires. What is it that causes one student to perform poorly and another to play his or her “A” Game all year long? This simple question is answered with a combination of humorous stories, simple advice, and practical strategies on student success. Kantis Simmons shares his proven Student Success System that has earned him three degrees with honors and more than $317,000 in academic scholarships. The schools he's worked with have seen their students' performance increase some 32%. You will be amazed to hear how this former NASA Research Scientist grew up battling with insecurity, adversity, and low self esteem due to an unexpected birth defect. After a series of life events, he learned how to overcome and defeat the mental battles that held him bound; the same ones that quietly tell today's student "you can't, you won't, and you'll never succeed." Kantis Simmons provides more than motivational rhetoric and theory. He gives-real life solutions that bring real-life results! For more information, click here.

This event is free and open to the public.

New Hampshire Burundian Association Dancers

Tuesday, September 20, 2011 at 7 p.m.
Sawyer Center Theater, Sawyer Fine Arts Center

An evening of drumming and dancing by the New Hampshire Burundian Association Dancers. The Burundian Association of New Hampshire is a nonprofit corporation that provides education about Burundi and Burundian heritage, promotes education, justice, and human rights for Burundian refugees who have been resettled in the United States, and supports the development of United States foreign policy and international policy in furtherance of human rights for the people of Burundi. The Association provides seminars and drumming presentations and workshops to schools, churches, and other organizations, and training in English as a second language and peer counseling to Burundian's that live in New Hampshire.

To order your tickets for this performace online, click here. Tickets are $5 Student/$10 Adult. Colby-Sawyer faculty, staff and students are eligible for one complimentary ticket with CSC ID. Please call the Sawyer Center Box Office at (603) 526-3670 for more information.

Film: The King's Speech

Monday, September 26, 2011 at 7 p.m.
Clements Hall, Curtis Ivey Science Center

Based on a true story, The King's Speech recounts King George VI's journey to overcome a debilitating speech impediment and unite his country in a time of war. Starring Colin Firth, Helena Bonham Carter and Geoffrey Rush, this film won Best Picture, Best Actor, Best Director and Best Original Screenplay at the 2011 Academy Awards. For more information on this film, click here.

This event is free and open to the public.

Slam Poet Jason Carney

Wednesday, September 28, 2011 at 8 p.m.
Wheeler Hall, Ware Campus Center

This event is co-sponsored by CAB and is free and open to the public.

In a rehabilitation center in his youth, Jason Carney's life was changed forever by a gay man who was dying from AIDS. Using poetry to redefine his world, he transformed the hate and racist ignorance of his southern upbringing. His life mission is to educate and participate in an honest conversation of race, class and gender. His shows use his own life experience to break the silence of his youth that still permeates every aspect of American culture. Jason Carney has appeared on several seasons of the HBO television show Russell Simmons Def Poets. He is a four time national poetry slam finalist. He was honored as a legend of slam poetry in 2006 and 2007. Jason has been seen on National Geographic Channel as well as local television channels across the United States. He has spoken and done workshops at high schools juvenile detention centers corporate diversity engagements as well as colleges and universities extensively in the fifty states.

This event is free and open to the public.

Loon Man

Tuesday, October 4, 2011 at 7 p.m.
Wheeler Hall, Ware Campus Center

Learn about loons from an expert in the field and his little loon mascot, Grapenut. John Rockwood (The Loon Man) is a dedicated naturalist, wildlife lecturer and nature photographer. Grapenut is a real loon chick/juvenile who adopted John into his loon family and shared all his young and incredible growing stages with him. Learning to fly, catching prey , playing hide and go seek and riding on his parents backs, are just some of the behaviors young Grapenut displayed to John from the time he was 4 days old in the summer until the time he fledged in late fall, as a juvenile. Utilizing his spectacular loon photography in his slide shows with time lapsed features, along with unique loon props, John and his wife Sue educate students about these very fascinating birds. Programs feature loon biology, behaviors, environment, migration patterns, and the challenges that loons are faced with for survival today. For more information, click here.

This event is free and open to the public.

Brot Coburn Presents: Everest: Challenges for Conservation and Cultural Preservation on the Roof of the World

Wednesday, October 5, 2011 at 7 p.m.
Wheeler Hall, Ware Campus Center

In this illustrated presentation, an exciting recap of the tragic 1996 climbing season on Mt. Everest acts as a launching pad for exploring some the history of Everest exploration (with an inside glimpse of the iconic 1963 American expedition, set in a volatile geo-political era) and a survey of the environmental issues facing the national parks to Everest's immediate north (in Tibet) and south (in Nepal). The program will also examine the momentous demographic, socio-economic and cultural shifts presently underway in this region.

Broughton Coburn graduated from Harvard College in 1973 and has worked two of the past three decades in the Himalayas. He developed documentary films and oversaw environmental conservation and development efforts for the World Bank, UNESCO, World Wildlife Fund, and other agencies. But he's known mainly as an author. Two of Coburn's books form the foundation for the Aama's Journey illustrated program. Nepali Aama: Life Lessons of a Himalayan Woman (Anchor/ Doubleday; now in its fourth edition), documents Aama's life as an elderly, subsistence farmer in the foothills of the Himalayas. The sequel, Aama in America: A Pilgrimage of the Heart (Anchor/Doubleday) is the dramatic and poignant tale of their 12,000 mile odyssey in search of the soul of the United States. In addition to acclaim as an illustrated lecture program, this story has been widely excerpted and a feature film screenplay is in progress.

Coburn has written magazine articles for New Age, Rock and Ice, The Denver Post Magazine, Co-Evolution Quarterly, Worldview and other magazines. Coburn also authored a young adult photo-biography of Sir Edmund Hillary, Triumph on Everest, for National Geographic Books. This was selected as a Notable Social Studies Trade Book for Young People for 2001 by the National Council for Social Studies and the Children's Book Council. In April of 2001 his collaboration with Jamling Tenzing Norgay, Touching My Father's Soul: A Sherpa's Journey to The Top of Everest (HarperSanFrancisco), his fifth book, reached #7 on the prestigious BookSense list, #24 on the New York Times list, was granted an Honorary Mention at the 2001 Banff Mountain Book Festival, and was a finalist for the coveted 2001 Books for a Better Life award.

This event is free and open to the public.

Michael Messner Presents: Boys, Empathy, and Sport

Monday, October 10, 2011 at 7 p.m.
Wheeler Hall, Ware Campus Center

A half-century ago, organized sports mirrored social beliefs about natural differences between the sexes by excluding girls, and viewing boys as naturally athletic. But since the 1970s, the explosion of female athletic participation has challenged that simplistic way of thinking. Has this change helped to spur a revolution of gender equality in sport and in families? Drawing from past research with male athletes, and from recent research on youth sports, Michael Messner points to the ways in which sport has changed, but also how it continues to shape--and often celebrate--gender differences and inequalities. A key part of this process is a suppression of boys' empathy for self and others. Intended to prepare boys for an assumed future in public life, this emotional stunting of boys can have negative outcomes in terms of health and interpersonal relationships, and serves to reinforce ideas about adult men's and women's supposed "natural" roles, thus short-circuiting some of the positive potentialities of sport to help build a world based on equality and care.

After receiving his B.A. and M.A. from C.S.U. Chico, Michael Messner earned his Ph.D. in Sociology at U.C. Berkeley. He is professor of sociology and gender studies at the University of Southern California, where he has worked for 24 years. His teaching and research focuses on gender and sports, men and masculinities, and gender violence. In 2010, the USC Center for Feminist Research released the most recent update of his longitudinal study, Gender in televised sports. He is the author of several books, including most recently It's all for the kids: Gender, families and youth sports (California, 2009), and King of the wild suburb: A memoir of fathers, sons and guns (Plain View Press, 2011). Messner is currently researching men who work with boys and men to stop gender-based violence. In 2011, the California Women's Law Center honored him with its Pursuit of Justice Award, for his work in support of girls and women in sport. For more information, click here.

This event is free and open to the public.

CEC Film: Willing and Able

Monday, October 24, 2011 at 7 p.m.
Clements Hall, Curtis Ivey Science Center

This documentary about a successful inclusion education program in a K-5 school takes you into the former Patrick O'Hearn School in Dorchester, Massachusetts (now re-named the “Dr. William W. Henderson Inclusion Elementary School”) – where about one third of the students are disabled in some way. This film is a rare glimpse into the workings of a highly successful elementary inclusion program in an urban public school. The students receive high grades in the MCAS (Massachusetts Comprehensive Assessment System) tests. And there is a waiting list to enroll, for both disabled and other children. Ultimately, the film presents a worldview best expressed by the former Principal, Dr. Henderson, that “…every one of us is unique and we all have needs, some more than others. But it also means that we can help each other change and grow.” For more information, click here. This film will be followed by a panel discussion, led by Assistant Professor Darcy Mitchell.

This event is free and open to the public.

Jennifer Pozner Presents - Project Brainwash: Why Reality TV Is Bad for Women
(…Men, People of Color, The Economy, Love, Sex and Sheer Common Sense!)

Wednesday, November 9, 2011 at 7 p.m.
Wheeler Hall, Ware Campus Center

In her eye-opening lecture “Project Brainwash: Why Reality TV is Bad for Women (...and Men, People of Color, The Economy, Love, Sex and Sheer Common Sense!),” Jennifer L. Pozner reveals who is creating a pop cultural backlash against women's rights and social progress, who is profiting from it, and why. Pozner takes a fierce, funny, and in-depth look at how reality TV affects our beliefs, our behavior, and our culture. Using humor, video clips from your favorite programs, and a decade of journalistic research, Pozner deconstructs reality TV's twisted fairytales, demonstrating that far from harmless “guilty pleasures,” this form of pop culture has a damaging impact on our intellectual and political development. Project Brainwash gives you the tools to understand and challenge stereotypes and become active, critical media consumers.

Jennifer L. Pozner, author of Reality Bites Back: The Troubling Truth About Guilty Pleasure TV, is the Executive Director of Women In Media & News, a national media analysis, education and advocacy group. A noted media critic, her work has been published in Newsday, Chicago Tribune, Ms. Magazine, Bitch magazine, and numerous publications and anthologies. She has offered media commentary on CNN, FOX, MSNBC, ABC News, PBS and NPR and has appeared on The Daily Show. Jennifer was named one of the New Leaders Council's 40 Under 40 progressive leaders in America 2009, a was chosen as member of “The Real Hot 100,” a Girls In Government project honoring young women leaders. Forbes magazine named her one of “20 Inspiring Women To Follow On Twitter,” and she appears alongside Arianna Huffington, Tyra Banks and Vera Wang as one of BizTechDaily's “25 Influential Business Women in New York City You Should Follow on Twitter.” For more information about Jen Pozner, click here.

This event is free and open to the public.

CL Lindsay Presents: Campus Computing from Free Speech to Facebook

Thursday, November 10, 2011 at 7 p.m.
Wheeler Hall, Ware Campus Center

This event is sponsored by New Student Orientation. It is expected that all first-year students will attend this program.

Learn what you can do to steer clear of trouble online. C.L. Lindsay discusses Facebook and MySpace, computing privacy, and how what you do online now can affect your future. C.L. Lindsay is a lawyer, author and nationally recognized expert and leader in the field of student rights and academic freedom. He is the author of “The College Student's Guide to the Law: Get a Grade Changed, Keep Your Stuff Private, Throw a Police-Free Party, and More!”. He has appeared on national television, radio and has been featured in countless regional and national publications, including US News & World Reports, The Chronicle of Higher Education, The Review of Higher Education, The Chicago Tribune, The Washington Post, The Cleveland Plain Dealer, New York Daily News, Newsday, CBS News Radio, Radio Times with Marty Moss-Coane (NPR), The Sally Jesse Raphael Show, College Bound Teen, and The Christian Science Monitor.He graduated magna cum laude from Denison University, and received his J.D. from the University of Michigan. In his spare time, he teaches courses in Law and Literature at the University of Pennsylvania.

This event is free and open to the public.

Film and Discussion: The Anatomy of Hate, A Dialogue to Hope

Monday, November 14, 2011 at 7 p.m.
Wheeler Hall, Ware Campus Center

This film reveals the shared narratives found in individual and collective ideologies of hate, and how we as a species can overcome them. For six years the filmmaker worked with unprecedented access to some of the most venomous ideologies and violent conflicts of our time including the White Supremacist movement, Christian Fundamentalism as an anti-gay platform, Muslim Extremism, the Palestinian Intifada, Israeli Settlers and Soldiers, and US Forces in Iraq. By juxtaposing this verite footage with interviews from leading sociological, psychological, and neurological experts, and interspersing stories of redemption told by former “combatants”, the film weaves a tapestry that reveals both the emotional and biological mechanisms which make all of us susceptible to acts and ideologies of hate, and demonstrates how these very same traits make us equally capable of overcoming them.

Darcy Mitchell, Assistant Professor of Social Sciences and Education will lead a post-film discussion. For more information, click here.

This event is free and open to the public.

Bill Miller

Tuesday, November 29, 2011
Wheeler Hall, Ware Campus Center

For years, Bill Miller's music has moved audiences around the world. He's an icon of the Native American music community, having won 3 Grammys in 2007, 2008, and 2010. Beyond music, Bill Miller is an accomplished painter whose work has appeared in The National Museum of the American Indian (Smithsonian Institution), the Barbara Able Gallery in Santa Fe, the Trickster Gallery in Chicago, and the American Indian Community House Gallery in New York. He is also an in-demand keynote speaker and lecturer, speaking at universities, race relations conferences and cultural awareness programs nationwide. For more information, click here.

This event is free and open to the public.